TOUR & User Guide
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SEARCH CASES

BOOLEAN SEARCHES

WILDCARD SEARCHES

SEARCH CODES AND RULES OF COURT

SEARCH LOCAL RULES

By Rule
Advanced Search
Natural Language

SAMPLE RESEARCH PROJECT

COPY & PASTE

PRINTING

SAVING

ICONS: WHAT DO THEY MEAN?

CHECKMATE

SEARCH CASES

The Search Cases databases include: 2d Series Cases, 3d Series Cases and 4th Series Cases. These are the official California Supreme Court Cases (Cal.2d, Cal. 3d, Cal.4th) and official California Appellate Cases (Cal.App.2d, Cal.App.3d and Cal.App.4th).
Search Cases also includes Daily Opinions (decisions filed the previous day). They remain in Daily Opinions until they have a citation. At that time they are transferred to 4th Series Cases which includes Cal.4th and Cal.App.4th.
To begin your research, first select a method by which you would like to conduct your search. Go to Search Menu in the left frame. Just click on one of the following:

SEARCH CASES

By Citation
By Party Name
By Docket Number
Keyword Search
Advanced Search
Natural Language

Search Cases By Citation

The JuriSearch® search engine recognizes official citations only (California Supreme Court Cases -- Cal.2d, Cal.3d, Cal.4th and California Appellate Cases -- Cal.App.2d, Cal.App.3d, and Cal.App.4th). It does not search for parallel cites such as California Reporter or Pacific Reporter.

  1. If you have the correct citation, type the volume and page number in the appropriate boxes. For example, for Xuereb v. Marcus & Millichap, Inc. (1992) 3 Cal.App.4th 1338, you would type 3 in the Vol. box and you would type 1338 in the Page box.



  2. All databases are selected by default. To search only one database, click on the database you want to search. Since the Xuereb case is a Cal.App.4th case, we will select California 4th Series Cases. This database will remain highlighted.
  3. Daily Opinions are not listed in this database because Daily Opinions do not yet carry an official citation.
  4. If you do not have the correct citation or if you only have an inside page, use another search method such as Party Name, Keyword Search, Advanced Search or Natural Language Search. DO NOT search By Citation.
  5. Click on "Find It!"
  6. A new screen with your Search Results will appear.



  7. The Search Results tell you how many Hits you have.
  8. Below the Hits is a Results Map which becomes significant when conducting a Keyword Search or Advanced Search.
  9. To see the results of your search, click on Click Here to View Results.
  10. The results of your search will appear in two frames. In the left frame is a Table of Contents with your citation. In the right frame is the case.

    citation.gif (39847 bytes)

  11. To view the case in full screen, click on the Document icon in the bottom frame.
  12. The case in full screen will appear.

    citation2.gif (37007 bytes)

  13. To return to the double screen with citation in the left frame and the case in the right frame, click on Browse in the bottom frame.
  14. To view the table of contents in full screen, click on the Contents icon in the bottom frame.
  15. If you want to retrieve a California case cited within the case you are reading, place your cursor directly on the citation and click on the citation.



  16. The new case will appear.
  17. To return to the original case, simply place the cursor on the Back arrow on your browser's toolbar, and you will return to your original case. [Note: This option works only for California cases and U.S. Supreme Court cases.]
  18. For printing instructions, click here.


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Search Cases By Party Name

This search method should be used only if you know the exact name and spelling of the parties. Do not use this method if you are unsure of a party’s name. Instead, use another search method such as Citation Search (if you know the citation), Keyword Search, Advanced Search or Natural Language Search.

Suppose you want to find the case: Xuereb v. Marcus & Millichap, Inc. (1992)

3 Cal.App.4th 1338. Here's how:

  1. In the left frame where it says Search Cases, click on By Party Name.



  2. If you know the name(s) of one or both parties, type one or both names in the box that says Party Name.
  3. For Xuereb v. Marcus & Millichap, Inc.,
    type: Xuereb
  4. You can also type:
    Xuereb Marcus or Xuereb v. Marcus.
  5. All databases are selected by default.
  6. If you would like to search only one database, click on the database you want to search. This database will remain highlighted.
  7. Click on "Find It!"



  8. A new screen with your Search Results will appear.



  9. A search of Xuereb and Marcus has resulted in one Hit.
  10. To see the results of your search, click on Click Here to View Results.
  11. The results of your search will appear in two frames. On the left is a table of contents with the citation of the case containing the party’s names you searched. In the right frame is the full case.

    citation.gif (39847 bytes)

  12. To view the case in full screen, click on the Document icon in the bottom frame.
  13. To view the citation in full screen, click on the Contents icon in the bottom frame.
  14. If you want to retrieve a California case cited within the case you are reading, place your cursor directly on the citation of the case you want to view and click on the citation.
  15. The case cited will appear.
  16. To return to the original case simply place the cursor on the Back arrow on your browser's toolbar, and you will return to your original case. [Note: This option works only for California cases and U.S. Supreme Court cases.]
  17. For printing instructions, click here.

 

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Search Cases By Docket Number


Suppose you want to find a particular case, but you DO NOT have the citation and you only have the docket number. Use the following search method. [BEWARE! This search method should be used only if you know the exact Docket Number. Otherwise, use another search method.]

Suppose you want to find the case with Court of Appeal Docket Number A051052.
Here's how:

  1. Type the docket number A051052 in the appropriate box.



  2. All databases are selected by default. If you do not know what database your case is in you can search all four databases. All four databases, 2d Series, 3d Series, 4th Series and Daily Opinions, will remain highlighted.
  3. If you know what database your case is in and you would like to search only that one database, click on the database you want to search. Only this database will remain highlighted.
  4. Suppose we do not know what database case A051052 is in.
  5. If you DO NOT know the Docket Number of your case, DO NOT use this search method. Use another search method such as Citation Search (if you know the citation), Advanced Search or Natural Language Search.
  6. Click on "Find It!"
  7. A new screen with your Search Results will appear.




  8. To see the results of your search, click on Click Here to View Results.
  9. The results of your search will appear in two frames. On the left is a table of contents with the docket number of your case.
  10. In the right frame is the case.
  11. To view the case in full screen, click on the Document icon in the bottom frame.
  12. To view the citation in full screen, click on the Contents icon in the bottom frame.
  13. If you want to retrieve a California case cited within the case you are reading, place your cursor directly on the citation of the case you want to view. The case cited will appear.
  14. To return to the original case simply place the cursor on the Back arrow on your browser's toolbar, and you will return to your original case. [Note: This option works only for California cases and U.S. Supreme Court cases.]
  15. For printing instructions, click here.

 

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Search Cases By Keyword Search


Key word searches are an easy way to find the relevant case law you need.

  1. In the left frame where it says Search Cases, click on Keyword Search.
  2. A new screen will appear.



  3. Place your cursor in the “Keyword” box. Type your keywords with spaces in between them (i.e. contract damages). JuriSearch® will look for these words in any order. If you enter a phrase in quotations (i.e. "search and seizure"), JuriSearch® will look for these exact words in this order.
  4. Let’s conduct a search for forum selection clause which words we will type in the "Keyword" box.
  5. All databases are selected by default.
  6. If you would like to search all three databases, leave Select Database(s) as is. The 2d Series, 3d Series, 4th Series and Daily Opinions will remain highlighted and will be searched.
  7. Otherwise, click on just the databases you would like to search. These databases will remain highlighted. Let’s select 4th Series and Daily Opinions.
  8. The Display Options are defaulted at Headings with Hits.
  9. The Display Options are defaulted at 10 words around Hits.
  10. When your search is displayed, your search “forum selection clause” will have 10 words around it so that you can see the context of your search.
  11. Click on "Find It!"
  12. A new screen with your Search Results for the 4th Series and Daily Opinions will appear.
  13. Below the Search Results are the Hits.
  14. A Hit is the number of times your search appears in a paragraph or the full text (depending on which option you select). For our sample search, the Hits are the number of times the words forum, selection and clause appear in a paragraph. Hits do not refer to the number of cases.




  15. For the 4th Series Cases there are 103 Hits.
  16. For Daily Opinions, there is 1 Hit.
  17. When you have no Hits, you will receive a message to “Go back and revise your search.”
  18. Below the Search Results is a Results Map. The Results Map shows the number of Hits with each combination of words. A review of the Results Map will show you where you might want to change your search.
  19. To see the results of your search, click on Click Here to View Results.
  20. Let’s view 4th Series Cases so click on Click Here to View Results under “Records with Hits: 103.”
  21. The results of your search will appear in two frames.
  22. On the left is a table of contents with a list of cases containing your search. In the right frame is the full case of the first case listed in the table of contents.

    keyword2.gif (43326 bytes)

  23. To view the case in full screen, click on the Document icon in the bottom frame.
  24. To view the table of contents in full screen, click on the Table icon in the bottom frame.
  25. The most recent California Supreme Court cases will appear first followed by California Courts of Appeal cases.
  26. If you are reading a case and come across a California case that you want to view, place your cursor directly on the citation of this case. Click the cursor and you will go directly to the case cited. This is a hypertext jump. To return to the original case simply place the cursor on the Back arrow on your browser's toolbar, and you will return to your original case. [Note: This option works only for California cases and U.S. Supreme Court cases.]
  27. In conducting a search, you may also use Full Boolean Connectors (AND, NOT, OR, XOR). For instance, a query may consist of several words with "And", "Or", "Not" as in: contract AND agreement, contract OR agreement, contract NOT agreement, contract XOR agreement.
  28. You may conduct single character Wildcard Searches by placing a question mark on the relevant letter. (I.e. wom?n to find woman or women.)
  29. You may conduct Multiple Character Wildcard Searches by placing an asterisk after a word or partial word. (I.e. work* to find work, worked, workers', workplace, working, etc.)
  30. You may conduct Stem (Word Form) Searches by placing a % after a word. (I.e. run% to find ran, run, running, runs, etc.)
  31. You may conduct Thesaurus (Synonym) Searches by placing a $ after the word. (I.e. murder$ will find cases with murder, killing, assassination, homicide, etc.)
  32. For printing instructions, click here.

 

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Search Cases By Advanced Search


Key word searches are an easy way to find the relevant case law you need.

  1. In the left frame where it says Search Cases, click on Advanced Search.
  2. A new screen will appear.

    advanced.gif (14545 bytes)

  3. If you want to find cases where your search terms appear in the same paragraph, type your search terms in the "Keyword(s) in Paragraph" box. For example, if you type a search for drunk driving, JuriSearch® will find all paragraphs that have both of those words in the same paragraph.
  4. Place your cursor in the “Keyword(s) in Paragraph” box. Type your keywords with spaces in between them (i.e. contract damages). JuriSearch® will look for these words in any order. If you enter a phrase in quotations (i.e. "search and seizure"), JuriSearch® will look for these exact words in this order.
  5. There may be times when it is NOT important that the two search words are in the same paragraph, but IT IS important that the word be in the same opinion. If so, type your search in the "Keyword(s) In Full Text" box. For example, if you type a search for vehicle homicide, this will provide all opinions that contain the words "vehicle" and "homicide" in the case as a whole.
  6. Or, if you want to find cases with the words "drunk" and "driving" in the same paragraph and the words "vehicle" and "homicide" in the entire opinion, you can combine a paragraph search with a full text search by typing drunk driving in the "Keyword(s) in Paragraph" box and vehicle homicide in the "Keyword(s) In Full Text" box.
  7. Let’s conduct a search for attorney or attorney’s and mistake and Code of civil procedure Section 473. Type attorney or attorney’s and mistake in the "Keyword(s) in Paragraph" box and civil or ccp and 473 in the "Keyword(s) In Full Text" box.
  8. All databases are selected by default.
  9. If you would like to search all three databases, leave Select Database(s) as is. The 2d Series, 3d Series, 4th Series and Daily Opinions will remain highlighted and will be searched.
  10. If you would like to search only one database, click on the database you want to search. This database will remain highlighted.
  11. The Display Options are defaulted at 10 words around Hits.
  12. When your search appears your search words “drunk driving” and “vehicle homicide” will have 10 words around them so that you can see the context of your search.
  13. Click on "Find It!"
  14. A new screen with your Search Results for the 2d Series, 3d Series, 4th Series and Daily Opinions will appear.
  15. Below the Search Results are the Hits.
  16. A Hit is the number of times your search appears in a paragraph or the full text (depending on which option you select). For our sample search, the Hits are the number of times drunk driving appears in a paragraph and vehicle homicide appears in the full case. Hits do not refer to the number of cases.





  17. For the 2d Series Cases, there are 108 Hits.
  18. For the 3d Series Cases, there are 71 Hits.
  19. For the 4th Series Cases there are 107 Hits.
  20. For Daily Opinions, there are 0 Hits.
  21. When you have no Hits, you will receive a message to “Go back and revise your search.”
  22. There are no Hits in Daily Opinions because you cannot do a full text search of Current Cases.
  23. Below the box is a Results Map. The Results Map shows the number of Hits with each combination of words. A review of the Results Map will show you where you might want to change your search.
  24. To see the results of your search, click on Click Here to View Results.
  25. Let’s view 4th Series Cases so click on Click Here to View Results.
  26. The results of your search will appear in two frames.
  27. On the left is a table of contents with a list of cases containing your search. In the right frame is the full case of the first case listed in the table of contents.



  28. The most recent California Supreme Court cases will appear first followed by California Courts of Appeal cases.
  29. To view the case in full screen, click on the Document icon in the bottom frame.
  30. To view the table of contents in full screen, click on the Table icon in the bottom frame.
  31. Let’s click on Document and view the case in full screen.
  32. If you are reading a case and come across a California case that you want to view, place your cursor directly on the citation of this case. Click the cursor and you will go directly to the case cited. This is a hypertext jump.
  33. To return to the original case simply place the cursor on the Back arrow on your browser's toolbar, and you will return to your original case. [Note: This option works only for California cases and U.S. Supreme Court cases.] To return to the original case simply place the cursor on the Back arrow on your browser's toolbar, and you will return to your original case. [Note: This option works only for California cases and U.S. Supreme Court cases.]



  34. In conducting a search, you may also use Full Boolean Connectors (AND, NOT, OR, XOR). For instance, a query may consist of several words with "And", "Or", "Not" as in: contract AND agreement, contract OR agreement, contract NOT agreement, contract XOR agreement.
  35. You may conduct single character Wildcard Searches by placing a question mark on the relevant letter. (I.e. wom?n to find woman or women.)
  36. You may conduct Multiple Character Wildcard Searches by placing an asterisk after a word or partial word. (I.e. work* to find work, worked, workers', workplace, working, etc.)
  37. You may conduct Stem (Word Form) Searches by placing a % after a word. (I.e. run% to find ran, run, running, runs, etc.)
  38. You may conduct Thesaurus (Synonym) Searches by placing a $ after the word. (I.e. murder$ will find cases with murder, killing, assassination, homicide, etc.)
  39. For printing instructions, click here.

 

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Search By Natural Language

  1. In the left frame where it says Search Cases, click on By Natural Language.
  2. A new screen will appear.



  3. Place your cursor in the Type Search Terms box. Enter a phrase or sentence in plain English (e.g. "When are attorneys fees authorized?")
  4. Select the database(s) you'd like to search.
  5. All databases are selected by default. If you would like to search only one database, click on the database you want to search. This database will remain highlighted.
  6. Click on "Find It!"
  7. The results will appear in a ranked format, with the source containing the most relevant material first. Many common terms, such as "and", "the” and the like will be omitted to speed up the search.
  8. On the "Search Results" page, the database in which you are searching will be followed by the “Most relevant hits listed,” including the ranking number and Hit Reference.
  9. To view the source, click on the Rank number.
  10. Unlike with other searches, the results of your search will appear in full frame.
  11. If you are reading a case and come across a California case that you want to view, place your cursor directly on the citation of this case and click on the citation. You will go directly to the case cited. This is a hypertext jump. To return to the original case simply place the cursor on the Back arrow on your browser's toolbar, and you will return to your original case. [Note: This option works only for California cases and U.S. Supreme Court cases.]
  12. For printing instructions, click here.

 

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BOOLEAN SEARCHES

Boolean Operators

  1. In conducting a search, you may also use Boolean operators (AND, NOT, OR, XOR).
  2. The Boolean operators allow you to refine your queries to focus on more specific or more general information than may be found with a single word or phrase search.
  3. Boolean connectors require a word or phrase on either side of the operator. For example, dog or cat is a valid query, but or cat is not.
  4. There are four Boolean operators: And, Or, Not, Exclusive Or. See Operator Precedence for a discussion of the precedence (order of execution) of these operators and how to override the precedence.



Boolean operator: And

  1. Use the And operator to search for multiple words in the same record (this is same as the multiple word search described in Simple Queries).
  2. The And operator may be specified any one of three ways: a single space between words, the ampersand &, or the word and.


Query  Explanation
Summary judgment 
Summary & judgment 
Summary and judgment 
Finds all records which contain both summary and judgment
Summary and judgment and  “motion granted”  Finds all records which contain both summary judgment the phrase “motion granted”


 
 
 
 

Boolean Operator: Or

  1. Use the Or operator to search for multiple words in the infobase (the words may or may not be in the same record).
  2. The Or operator may be specified by the word or.


Query  Explanation
contract or agreement Finds all records which contain either contract or agreement (may contain both)
contract or agreement and insurance Finds all records which contain insurance and either contract or agreement (or both contract and agreement)


 
 
 
 

Boolean Operator: Not

  1. Use the Not operator to search for records which do not contain a particular term or set of terms. Not is actually a unary operator (it can be used by itself), but it is often used in between two terms (find records which contain A but not B).
  2. Generally, the best way to think of the Not operator when used between two terms (A not B) is "find records with A and find records without B" (A and not B).
  3. The Not operator may be specified one of two ways: the caret ^ or the word not. (The caret ^ is usually above the number 6 on the keyboard)


Query  Explanation
overruled ^ demurrer 
overruled not demurrer
Finds all records which contain overruled but which do not contain demurrer
^ overruled  not overruled Finds all records which do not contain overruled. (In this type of query, nothing is highlighted. Next & Previous Hit take you to the next and previous records which do not contain the term)


 
 
 
 

Boolean Operator: XOr (Exclusive Or)

  1. Use the XOr operator to search for records which contain one of two words but not both.
  2. The XOr operator may be specified one of two ways: the tilde ~ or the term xor.


Query  Explanation
contract ~ agreement Finds all records which contain either contract or agreement but which do not contain both contract and agreement


 
 
 
 

Operator Precedence

  1. The query operators have a precedence order. That is, when two more operators are used in a query, the results of one operator will be evaluated before another operator. Understanding the precedence and how to override the precedence can assist you in finding the information you need.
  2. The operator precedence is: Not, Or, XOr, And
  3. If the same operators are used in a query (for example, if Or appears twice in a query), the operators are evaluated from left-to-right.
  4. For example, consider the following query: dog or cat and mouse not cheese
  5. This query is evaluated in the following order:
    1. not cheese (records which do not contain cheese)
    2. dog or cat (records which contain either dog or cat)
    3. and mouse (and all records in the identified subset which contain mouse).
  6. These rules allow you to create powerful queries; however, they can also be confusing. To ensure the correct terms are combined with the correct operators, use parentheses around the terms and operators.
  7. For example, the following queries all produce different results:
    dog and (cat or mouse) not cheese
    dog and cat or (mouse not cheese)
    (dog and cat) or (mouse not cheese)
  8. The following query is the same as the first query in the above list, but is more explicit:
    (dog and (cat or mouse)) not cheese
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WILDCARD SEARCHES


Wildcards allow you to find words using patterns for a set of words (replacing single or multiple characters) and to find synonyms or word forms of a word.
Note that wildcards may be used in phrase and proximity searches.

Single Character

  1. I9. Use the single character wildcard to replace any single character in a term. Note that this wildcard is a replacement wildcard there must be a character in the wildcard position to register a hit.
  2. Two or more single character wildcards may be used in the same term, if necessary.
  3. The single character wildcard is the question mark ?.


Query  Explanation
wom?n Finds all terms which match the pattern (such as woman or women)
b??k Finds all four letter words which start with b and end with k (such as book, bilk, or bark)
“the best advi?e” Finds all phrases which match the pattern(such as “the best advise” or “the best advice”)


 
 
 
 


Multiple Character

  1. Use the multiple character wildcard to replace 0 or more characters in a term.
  2. Two or more multiple character wildcards may be used in the same term, if necessary.
  3. The multiple character wildcard is the asterisk (or star) *.


Query  Explanation
f*s Finds all terms which start with f and end with s (such as fees, favors, or finalizes)
work* Finds all terms which start with the pattern work (such as work, worked, or workers)
*ed Finds all phrases which end in ed ( such as worked, overruled, or red)
“the great* debate” Finds all records which contain phrases which match the pattern (such as “the great debate” or “the greatest debate”)


 
 
 
 





Synonym (or Thesaurus)

  1. Use the synonym (or thesaurus) wildcard to find synonyms of a term. Note that you cannot specify usage for the synonym; searching for synonyms of address could find both location ("What is your address?") and speak ("He addressed the audience").
  2. The synonym wildcard is the dollar sign $. (Since the $ looks like an S, you can remember that it applies to Synonym searches.)
  3. Note that the synonym wildcard must appear at the end of the term. The synonym wildcard may not be mixed with any other wildcards in the same term.

    Query  Explanation
    murder$ Finds synonyms of the term murder (such as will find cases with murder, killing, assassination, homicide, etc.)
    murder$ murder% Finds synonyms of murder and word forms of murder (word forms are discussed below).
    Synonym examples include killing, assassination, homicide, etc.
    Word Form (or Stem) Word stem examples include murder, murdered


     
     
     
     
     

  4. Use the word form (or stem) wildcard to find forms of a term. Word forms are defined by the parts of speech singular, plural, past tense, present tense, future tense, etc.
  5. Note that you do not need to specify a root word to perform a word form search. A word form search on long (a root word) should produce the same results as a word form search on longer.
  6. The word form wildcard is the percentage sign %.
  7. Note that the word form wildcard must appear at the end of the term. The word form wildcard may not be mixed with any other wildcards in the same term.


Query  Explanation
work% Finds word forms of the term (such as work, works, or working)
murder% Finds word forms of the term murder (such as murder or murdered)
“one if by land%” Finds phrases which begin with “one if by” and which end in word forms of land (such as land or landed)


 
 
 
 
 
Proximity Searches

  1. Proximity searches allow you to specify how close two (or more) words must be to each other in the same record in order to register a hit.
  2. You can specify either word proximity or record proximity searches.

Word Proximity

  1. Word proximity allows you to specify a range that all terms in the proximity search must appear in. The terms must be contained in the same record.
  2. Word proximity searches may be ordered or unordered.
  3. When creating a word proximity search, you must specify a range for the search. All terms in the proximity must appear in the specified range. The first word from the proximity search that is found begins the count for the range.
  4. For example, an ordered proximity search to find dog, cat, and rat within a 10 word range must find dog first. Dog counts as one word in the range. Both cat and rat must be found within the next nine words to register a hit. (In an unordered proximity, it would not matter which term was found first; the other two terms must be found within the next nine words.)
  5. Note that wildcards may be used in phrase and proximity searches.


Ordered Proximity

  1. Use ordered proximity to specify the order in which terms must appear within a given range to count as a hit. This is more restrictive than the unordered proximity search.
  2. The ordered proximity operator is the forward slash /. Terms in an ordered proximity search must be enclosed in quotes.
  3. As a side note, you may be interested to know that a phrase search is basically an ordered proximity search with a proximity equal to the number of terms in the phrase.


Query  Explanation
“abuse discretion”/5 Finds records which contain both abuse and discretion, in that order, within a five word range (i.e., abuse of discretion, abuse its discretion, abuse of the court's discretion)
“me and my shadow”/10 Finds records which contain these four terms, in order, within a 10 word range.


 
 
 
 

Unordered Proximity

  1. Use unordered proximity to specify a set of terms which must appear within a given range in any order.
  2. The unordered proximity operator is the at symbol @. Terms in an unordered proximity search must be enclosed in quotes.
Query  Explanation
“wrongful termination harassment”@14 Finds records which contain all three terms, in any order, within a 14 word range


 
 
 

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SEARCH CODES AND RULES OF COURT


You can search Codes and Rules of Court as follows:
By Section
By Advanced Search
By Natural Language

By Section

  1. To begin your search, click on By Section in the left.
  2. Select the Code you want from the pull down menu or select California Rules of Court.
  3. In the Section box type the Code section you are searching.
  4. Click on "Find It!" Or, hit Enter.
  5. If you failed to select a code you will receive an error message – “Code has not been selected. Please select a code.”
  6. A new screen with your Search Results will appear.
  7. Below Search Results, you will find Records With Hits. A Hit is the number of times your search appears in a paragraph.
  8. Below the box is a Results Map. The Results Map is mainly for use in keyword searches.
  9. To see the results of your search, click on Click Here to View Results.
  10. The results of your search will appear in two frames. On the left is a Table with the Code Section or Rule.
  11. In the right frame is the full Code Section or Rule.
  12. To view the Code Section in full screen, click on the Document icon in the bottom.
  13. For printing instructions, click here.

 

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By Advanced Search – When You Do Not Know the Code Section or Rule

  1. You want to find a Code Section, dealing with attorney mistake, but you do not know the code section.
  2. In the left frame where it says Search Codes, click on Advanced Search.
  3. You know the Code Section will probably be in Code of Civil Procedure, so select this Code from the pull down menu.
  4. Place your cursor in the Type Search Terms box. Type your keywords with spaces in between (i.e. summary judgment). JuriSearch® will look for these words in any order. If you enter a phrase in quotations (i.e. "attorney fees"), JuriSearch® will look for these words in this order.
  5. Display Options are defaulted at 10 words. This means that when your search appears, ten words will surround your search so that you can view the context of your search.
  6. Click on "Find It!" or hit Enter.
  7. A new screen with your Search Results will appear.
  8. Below Search Results, you will find Records With Hits
  9. Below the box is a Results Map.
  10. To see the results of your search, click on Click Here to View Results.
  11. The results of your search will appear in two frames. On the left is a Table with a list of Codes containing your search.
  12. In the right frame is the code section.
  13. To view the Code Section in full screen, click on the Document icon in the bottom frame.
  14. To view the Table of Code Section in full screen, click on the Table icon in the bottom frame.
  15. For printing instructions, click here.

 

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Search By Natural Language

  1. In the left frame where it says Search Codes, click on By Natural Language.
  2. A new screen will appear: Search California Codes By Natural Language.
  3. Place your cursor in the Type Search Terms box. Enter a phrase or sentence in plain English (e.g. "When are attorneys fees authorized?")
  4. Select the database(s) you'd like to search.
  5. All databases are selected by default. If you would like to search only one database, click on the database you want to search. This database will remain highlighted.
  6. Click on "Find It!"
  7. The Search Results will appear in a ranked format, with the source containing the most relevant material first. Many common terms, such as "and", "the” and the like will be omitted to speed up the search.
  8. On the "Search Results" page, “Most relevant hits listed” appear in a ranked format.
  9. Click on the ranking number to view that source.
  10. Your search will appear in full screen.
  11. For printing instructions, click here.

 

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Codes in Cases


JuriSearch® provides you with the opportunity to create an "annotated" code. For example, suppose you want to annotate Civil Code 1717. Select a case database: 2d Series Cases, 3d Series Cases, 4th Series Cases and Daily Opinions.

  1. Click on Keyword Search under Search Cases.
  2. We can search Civil 1717. However, we do not know if the court used Civil 1717 or Civ. 1717. Therefore, we will conduct a Multiple Character Wildcard Search by placing an asterisk after civ to find civ and civil.
  3. In the Keyword box, type civ* 1717
  4. Click on Find It! Or, hit Enter.
  5. A new screen with your Search Results.
  6. Below Search Results, you will find Records With Hits. Hit is the number of times your search appears in a paragraph or the full text depending on which option you chose.
  7. Below the box is a Results Map. The Results Map shows the number of Hits with each combination of words. A review of the Results Map will show you where you might want to change your search.
  8. To see the results of your search, click on Click Here to View Results.
  9. The results of your search will appear in two frames. On the left is a Table with a list of cases containing your search, Civ* 1717.
  10. In the right frame are the full cases.
  11. To view the cases in full screen, click on the Document icon in the bottom frame.
  12. To view the table of contents in full screen, click on the Contents icon in the bottom frame.
  13. For printing instructions, click here.

 

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Narrowing The Code Search


At times you will need to annotate a Code Section to meet your particular needs. For instance, suppose you wanted to search Code of Civil Procedure Section 473. If you conducted a search for Code of Civil Procedure Section 473 in the 4th Series Cases database, you would get hundreds of Hits.
Suppose you want to research "attorney’s mistake" in the context of Code of Civil Procedure, Section 473.

  1. From the left frame click on Advanced Search from under Search Cases.
  2. A screen entitled Search: California Cases: Advanced Search will appear.
  3. Place your cursor in the Keyword(s) in Paragraph box and type “473 attorney* mistake.
  4. We did not type in code of civil procedure or ccp because we do not know how the court worded the Code section.
  5. Click on “Find it!” Or, hit Enter.
  6. Your Search Results will appear
  7. Below Search Results, you will find Records With Hits. A Hit is the number of times your search appears in a paragraph or the full text (depending on which option you selected).
  8. Below the box is a Results Map. The Results Map shows the number of Hits with each combination of words. A review of the Results Map will show you where you might want to change your search.
  9. To see the results of your search, click on Click Here to View Results.
  10. The results of your search will appear in two frames. On the left is a table of contents with a list of cases containing your search, 473 attorney mistake.
  11. In the right frame is the full case corresponding to the citation in the left frame.
  12. To view the case in full screen, click on the Document icon in the bottom frame.
  13. To view the table of contents in full screen, click on the Contents icon in the bottom frame.
  14. For printing instructions, click here.

 

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SEARCH LOCAL RULES


You can search Local Rules as follows:
By Rule
By Advanced Search
By Natural Language

By Rule

  1. To begin your search, click on By Rule in the left frame.
  2. Select the County you want from the pull down menu.
  3. In the “Type Rule” box type the local rule number you are searching.
  4. Click on "Find It!" Or, hit Enter.
  5. If you fail to select a code you will receive an error message – “County has not been selected. Please select a county.”
  6. A new screen with your Search Results will appear.
  7. Below Search Results, you will find Records With Hits. A Hit is the number of times your search appears in a paragraph.
  8. Below the box is a Results Map. The Results Map is mainly for use in keyword searches.
  9. To see the results of your search, click on Click Here to View Results.
  10. The results of your search will appear in two frames. On the left is a Table with the local rule.
  11. In the right frame is the local rule.
  12. To view the rule in full screen, click on the Document icon in the bottom.
  13. For printing instructions, click here.
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By Advanced Search – When You Do Not Know the Rule Number


You want to find the local rule that deals with settlement conferences. You do not know the rule number.

  1. In the left frame where it says Search Local Rules, click on Advanced Search.
  2. You know you want to search in Los Angeles Superior Court. Select LA County Superior from the pull down menu.
  3. Place your cursor in the Type Search Terms box. Type your keywords with spaces in between (i.e. mandatory settlement conference). JuriSearch® will look for these words in any order. If you enter a phrase in quotations (i.e. "summary judgment"), JuriSearch® will look for these words in this order.
  4. Display Options are defaulted at 10 words. This means that when your search appears, ten words will surround your search so that you can view the context of your search.
  5. Click on "Find It!" or hit Enter.
  6. A new screen with your Search Results will appear.
  7. Below Search Results, you will find Records With Hits
  8. Below the box is a Results Map.
  9. To see the results of your search, click on Click Here to View Results.
  10. The results of your search will appear in two frames. On the left is a Table with a list of rules containing your search.
  11. In the right frame are the rules containing your search.
  12. To view the Code Section in full screen, click on the Document icon in the bottom frame.
  13. To view the Table of Rules in full screen, click on the Contents icon in the bottom frame.
  14. For printing instructions, click here.

 

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Search By Natural Language

  1. In the left frame where it says Search Local Rules, click on By Natural Language.
  2. A new screen will appear: Search Local Rules: Natural Language.
  3. Select the county you'd like to search.
  4. Place your cursor in the Type Search Terms box. Enter a phrase or sentence in plain English (e.g. "What are the requirements for filing a motion for summary judgment?")
  5. Click on "Find It!"
  6. The Search Results will appear followed by the local rules you are searching.
  7. Below are the “Most relevant hits listed” in a ranked format, with the source containing the most relevant material first. Many common terms, such as "and", "the” and the like will be omitted to speed up the search.
  8. On the "Search Results" page, click on the ranking number to view that source.
  9. The local rule in full screen will appear.
  10. For printing instructions, click here.

 

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SAMPLE RESEARCH PROJECT


Assume the following facts: You represent the buyer in a real estate contract. You have sued for breach of contract and fraud, and have sought damages as well as rescission. During the lawsuit your client's property is foreclosed. How does the foreclosure affect the damage formula?

  1. In the left frame where it says Search Cases, click on Keyword Search.
  2. A new screen will appear.
  3. Place the cursor in the "Keyword " box. Type the following words in the box (each word should be separated by a space): rescission damages foreclosure.
  4. All databases are selected by default.
  5. If you would like to search all three databases, leave Select Database(s) as is. The 2d Series, 3d Series Cases, 4th Series Cases and Daily Opinions will remain highlighted and will be searched.
  6. If you would like to search only one database, click on the database you want to search. Select only 4th Series Cases. This database will remain highlighted.
  7. Once you have typed your search and selected the database, click "Find it! Or, hit Enter.
  8. A new screen with the Search Results for the 4th Series Cases will appear.
  9. Below the Search Results are the Hits.
  10. A Hit is the number of times your search, rescission damages foreclosure, appears in a paragraph. Hits are not cases.
  11. For the 4th Series Cases there are 3 Hits.
  12. Below the box is a Results Map. The Results Map shows the number of Hits with each combination of words. A review of the Results Map will show you where you might want to change your search.
  13. To see the results of your search, click on Click Here to View Results.
  14. To view 4th Series Cases, click on Click Here to View Results.
  15. The results of your search will appear in two frames. On the left is a table of contents with a list of cases containing your search.
  16. In the right frame is the full case of the first case listed in the table of contents.
  17. To view the case in full screen, click on the Document icon in the bottom frame.
  18. To view the table of contents in full screen, click on the Table icon in the bottom frame.
  19. The most recent California Supreme Court cases will appear first followed by California Courts of Appeal cases.
  20. If you are reading a case and come across a California case that you want to view, place your cursor directly on the citation of this case. Click the cursor and you will go directly to the case cited. This is a hypertext jump. To return to the original case simply place the cursor on the Back arrow on your browser's toolbar, and you will return to your original case. [Note: This option works only for California cases and U.S. Supreme Court cases.]
  21. For printing instructions, click here.

 

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COPY AND PASTE INTO YOUR WORD PROCESSING PROGRAM

  1. Once you have found the data (case, code, etc.) in JuriSearch®, select Edit in the upper left portion of your browser's menu bar.



  2. Click on Select All from the Edit menu and the entire case or data will be highlighted. [Note: Or, you may use your cursor to select only the portions of the data you wish to copy. Using your mouse, place your cursor where you would like to begin copying, click once on the top left portion of your mouse button and hold it down while you drag to the end of your selection. Release the mouse button. Your selection should now be highlighted.]
  3. Select Edit in your browser's menu bar and click on Copy.
  4. Minimize your browser's screen by clicking the minus sign at the upper right hand portion of the tool bar. Go to your Start button (for Windows 95 and 97 users) and click on Programs. Start your word processing program.
  5. Select Edit from the menu in your word processing program and click on Paste Special.
  6. A new screen will appear. Select Unformatted Text. Hit OK.
  7. The text should be displayed in your word processor. [Note: Depending on which internet browser/version and word processing program you are using you may need to slightly format the pasted text (i.e. changing font size.)]
  8. Save the document as you would normally save a document in your word processing program.


TOGGLE METHOD OF CUTTING AND PASTING INTO YOUR WORD PROCESSING PROGRAM -- FOR WINDOWS 95and 98/3.1 USERS

  1. Open JuriSearch® and your word processing program. Close all other programs.
  2. Once you have found the data you desire in JuriSearch®, select Edit in the upper left portion of your browser's menu bar.
  3. Click on Select All from the Edit menu and the entire case or data will be highlighted. [Note: Or, you may use your cursor to select only the portions of the data you wish to copy. Using your mouse, place your cursor where you would like to begin copying, click once on the top left portion of your mouse button and hold it down while you drag to the end of your selection. Release the mouse button. Your selection should now be highlighted.]
  4. Select Edit in your browser's menu bar and click on Copy.
  5. Hold down the ALT button on your keyboard while you press the TAB button. This allows you to toggle to your word processing program. Release the ALT and TAB keys when you've selected the desired program.
  6. Select Edit from the menu in your word processing program and click on Paste Special.
  7. A new screen will appear. Select Unformatted Text. Hit OK.
  8. The text should be displayed in your word processor. [Note: Depending on which internet browser/version and word processing program you are using you may need to slightly format the pasted text.]
  9. Save the document as you would normally save a document in your word processing program.
  10. To go back to JuriSearch®, press ALT then TAB and hold the two buttons down together until JuriSearch® is displayed. To go back to your word processing program, press ALT then TAB until your word processing program is displayed. Repeated presses of the ALT then TAB will toggle between the open applications of JuriSearch® and your word processing program. This feature works with every Windows 95 or 97 or 3.1 system.

 

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PRINTING

PRINTING OF CASES – EXPLORER 4.0 or above

PRINTING SELECTED PORTIONS OF A CASE – EXPLORER 4.0 or above

PRINTING OF CASES – NETSCAPE

PRINTING OF CODES – EXPLORER 4.0 or above

PRINTING OF CODES – NETSCAPE

 

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SAVING A CASE


INTERNET EXPLORER

  1. If you want to save a case, go to Edit on the menu bar and click on Select All. The entire case or data will be highlighted.
  2. Use the File menu on your browser to select Save As.
  3. Save the case as a text file NOT an html file or Web Page. You may open this file using your word processing program so save it in a location that is easily accessible.


NETSCAPE COMMUNICATOR OR NAVIGATOR
Note: These instructions work for Netscape users only. This function does not work with Internet Explorer.

  1. If you want to save a case, use the File menu on your browser to select Save As. (Note that File/Save As only refers to the pages you are currently viewing.)
  2. After selecting the Save As option, save the case as a text file NOT an html file. Also, you may change the file name. Later, you may open this file using your word processing program and print the entire case, so save it in a location that is easily accessible (i.e. C:\research). Usually, the software will display a number of pages for the case (10-15), and you may need to repeat this process.
  3. Scroll to the bottom of the screen and click on Next Page. This will take you to the next set of pages.
  4. Repeat until the end of the case.
  5. The beginning of the next case may be included when saving and printing. Either discard the unnecessary pages or you may cut these pages in your word processing program using the word processor's Cut and Edit features.

 

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ICONS: What do they mean?

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CHECKMATE

1. Pull up a case through any search method.

2. On the face of each case there are two buttons. One will say "CheckMate", the other will say "Case History".

3. Click the "CheckMate" button. You will go to a page with the name of your case in bold, and any overruling, disapproving, or superseding authority directly underneath it in normal type. Each overruling/disapproving citation will have a link directing you to that case.

4. If there is no overruling/superseding authority, you will return to a screen saying "No overruling or superseding authority".

5. From the CheckMate screen, or from the case itself, you can also access a case history.

6. Click the "Case History" button from either the CheckMate page, or the case itself. You will access up to 1000 citations of your case.

7. The case will be returned in table format organized by series (i.e. 2d, 3d, or 4th). You will be able to read the citation of the case in context to get an idea of how the citing case treated it.

8. Since all cases are of equal "rank" as determined by our search engine, each will return with a rank of "0", which is irrelevant in determining the case history.

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Updated January 2000
Copyright 2004, JuriSearch®
JuriSearch®, LLC